Dedicated to conservation of the African Lion

Member Bios

Autobiographies of ALWG members

Dr. Amy Dickman
Dr. Alayne Cotterill
Dr. Laurence G.Frank
Dr. Colleen Begg
Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld
Dr. Luca Pius Rutina
Dr. Susan Miller
Dr. Hans Bauer
Dr. Laura Bertola
Dr. Gus Mills
Mr. Colin Wenham
Ms. Shivani Bhalla
Mr. Dereck Joubert
Dr. Sam Ferreira
Dr. Paul Funston
Dr. Bruce Patterson
Dr. Cole Burton
Dr. Ilaria Di Silvestre
Ms. Paola Bouley
Mr. John J. Jackson, III
Mr. Nic Elliot
Prof. Dr. Hans De Iongh
Dr. Charles T. T. Edwards
Professor David Macdonald
Dr. Andrew Loveridge
Ms. Tammy Hoth
Ms. Yolan Friedmann
Dr. Harriet Davies-Mostert
Dr. Kelly Marnewick
Dr. Norman John Monks
Mr. Kiki Martial
Mr. Brent Stapelkamp
Dr. Philipp Henschel
Ms. Lise Hanssen
Professor Claudio Sillero
Dr. Vivienne Williams
Mr Jason Riggio
Mr Andrew Jacobson
Mr Andrei Snyman
Dr Ross Barnett
Dr Charles T. T. Edwards
Dr Charles Musyoki
Mr Christiaan and Mrs Hanlie Winterbach
Dr Dennis Ikanda
Dr Emily Fitzherbert
Dr Glyn Maude
Mr Gus van Dyk
Mr Jan Broekhuis
Dr Jeremy Anderson
Mr Jeremy Goss
Prof Kathleen A. Alexander
Ms Kristin Nowell
Ms Lana Müller
Dr Laurence Frank
Dr Ludwig Siefert
Dr Luke Dollar
Dr Nobuyuki Yamaguchi
Dr Stephanie Dolrenry
Dr Paula A. White
Dr Pricelia Tumenta
Dr. Frank P.G. Princée
Dr. Etotépé A. Sogbohossou

Dr.Amy Dickman
Amy is the Kaplan Senior Research Fellow in Felid Conservation at Oxford University, and has over 17 years’ experience working on large carnivores in Africa, specializing in big cats. She has an MSc from Oxford University and a PhD from University College London, and has published over 35 scientific papers and book chapters on large carnivore ecology and conservation. She is a member of the IUCN Cat Specialist Group, the Human-Wildlife Conflict Collaboration, and serves as an Expert on National Geographic Expeditions. In 2011, she was awarded the Rabinowitz-Kaplan Prize for the Next Generation in Wild Cat Conservation, while in 2014 she was one of three international finalists for the prestigious Tusk Conservation Award. Amy established the Ruaha Carnivore Project, based in southern Tanzania, in 2009. The Ruaha landscape is one of the most important areas in the world for lions and other large carnivores, and Amy and her Tanzanian team are researching carnivore ecology and working to reduce human-carnivore conflict in this critical area. The project focuses upon reducing carnivore attacks, providing local communities with real benefits from carnivore presence, and training the next generation of local conservation leaders, and has had marked conservation success.

Dr. Alayne Cotterill
Alayne has worked in wildlife conservation in Africa since 1991. Her primary area of expertise became large carnivore/human conflict after carrying out the first cost benefit analysis for including lions in the growing private wildlife reserves in Southern Africa as part of her MSc. For the 18 years since, she has built extensive experience in African carnivore research in both Southern and East Africa, the last 7 years of which have been as a biologist for the Laikipia Predator Project. Alayne is the recipient of two Panthera Kaplan Graduate Awards and has a D.Phil. with Oxford University’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, looking at the effects of conflict with people on lion behavioural ecology and demography.

Dr. Laurence G. Frank
Laurence has been a research associate at the University of California, Berkeley since 1984, first as part of the Berkeley Hyena Project and currently in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology. He has worked on predators in Kenya for forty years, including twenty years studying the behavioural ecology and endocrinology of the spotted hyena before turning to conservation research.

Dr. Colleen Begg
Colleen and her husband Keith are the founders and leader of the Niassa Carnivore Project in Niassa National Reserve, Mozambique. They started this project to secure the large carnivore populations in Niassa Reserve in 2013 and now manage a team of more than 40 permanent staff and 80 seasonal workers from local communities. They work in collaboration with the Niassa Reserve Management team.  The communities are involved in every aspect of their work to conserve lions as all the main threats (other than underage sport hunting) are linked to people (disease threat from domestic dogs, bushmeat snaring, retaliatory killing in response to attacks on people and livestock, habitat transformation, food insecurity).  NCPs three long term goals are to directly mitigate threats to lions and other large carnivores, develop a model of community partnership that works in Niassa Reserve and develop an Environmental Education and Skills training programs for people who live inside the protected area. They only hire  Mozambicans, 90% from local communities,  identify threats and then  find and test solutions with communities involved in testing, monitoring and implementing from the beginning – this includes livestock husbandry, improving goat corrals, conservation agriculture, elephant-beehive fences to increase food security, living fences, educational programs for local children and adults, mentor-ship and training including skills training for adults for alternative livelihoods, anti-poaching using community supported scouts and lion scholarships for children. They believe that if they get it right with the communities the lions will look after themselves.

Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld
Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld is a woman with a passion for Africa. She lives in Tanzania and is co-founder and executive director of the African People & Wildlife Fund and a visiting fellow of Yale University’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. She has over 20 years of experience in East Africa working with large carnivores, local communities and community-based conservation programs. Dr. Lichtenfeld received a Ph.D. from Yale University in 2005 for her research combining wildlife ecology and social ecology in an interdisciplinary study of human-lion relationships, interactions and conflicts. She is a National Geographic Explorer, a member of the Clinton Global Initiative, the Yale Large Carnivore Group, the National Geographic Big Cats Initiative and the recipient of the Fulbright Award. Her work has been featured widely including by National Geographic and TED

Northern Tanzania Big Cats Conservation Initiative
To protect big cats, their habitat and prey by partnering with local communities in Tanzania
The African People; Wildlife Fund’s Big Cats Conservation Initiative in the northern Tanzania is working to save the country’s most threatened lion population as well as important populations of cheetahs and leopards. In this vast and magnificent landscape (40,000 km²), big cats depend on community lands for their persistence, moving well beyond the borders of two small protected areas – Tarangire National Park (2600 km²) and Lake Manyara National Park (330 km²). Partnering with local communities, our holistic conservation programme integrates big cat monitoring, big cat–livestock conflict prevention efforts, community environmental education, conservation enterprise and the protection of big cats, their habitat and prey via the support of local teams of “Warriors for Wildlife”.

Working from the organisation’s rural environmental centre, Noloholo, our large team of Tanzanian scientists, conservationists, educators and community members effectively conserve big cats by preventing conflicts, protecting prey species and habitats, raising awareness and interest in big cats and wildlife conservation, and developing the means for rural people to benefit from their natural environment and wildlife populations. Notable and unique features of our programme include:
Living Walls: This project represents the largest, environmentally friendly effort to prevent lion–livestock conflicts in Tanzania. We construct Living Walls by planting native trees and weaving the growing branches through chain link fencing. Once planted, the trees take root and grow into an impenetrable, natural livestock enclosure. Developed by our Maasai team, Living Walls are a proven, highly successful technique for preventing lions and other large carnivores from attacking cattle, goats and sheep in their corrals. More than 500 Living Walls are currently in place across 5400 km² of lion habitat and protecting approximately 100,000 head of livestock on a nightly basis. Importantly, this has eliminated the need for retaliatory killings of lions; no lions were killed at homesteads with effectively installed Living Walls since the beginning of this programme and the lion population is showing early signs of recovery in the project’s focal area.

Warriors for Wildlife: This project trains and deploys local Maasai community members into their own villages as community-based conservationists. Their work covers a wide range of community-based wildlife and habitat conservation activities – patrols to prevent illegal deforestation, bush fire management, poaching prevention, lost livestock searches and, of course, the construction of lion-proof, Living Wall livestock enclosures.

Environmental Education and Noloholo Environmental Scholars: Our education team is busy building enthusiasm and commitment to the natural world with a variety of activities for local youth – including wildlife clubs, national park field trips, the very first environmental summer camps in Tanzania and our highly popular scholarship programme – as well as adult education seminars in rangeland management, climate change adaptation, environmentally friendly business development, watershed protection and women’s roles in environmental management. Currently, we support 25 Noloholo Environmental Scholars with guaranteed full tuition over a period of six years to a well-regarded, private high school (secondary school) on the edge of the Maasai Steppe. These are the future conservation leaders of the Maasai Steppe.

Emerging efforts of the programme include the establishment of communal protected areas that provide ecological and/or financial benefits to local people while protecting critical big cat territories as well as support for the establishment of environmentally-friendly businesses. Through our strategic partnerships, educational and capacity building opportunities and on-the-ground community environmental protection teams, the African People & Wildlife Fund is fostering the real engagement of local communities in sustainable and adaptive natural resource management. With our comprehensive and holistic big cat conservation programme, we are successfully spearheading a unique conservation model that can be applied widely in Africa where integrative community approaches to managing landscapes for the benefit of people, livestock and big cats are required.

Dr Lucas Pius Rutina
In the Makgadikgadi we are conducting a collaborate study with the aim of engaging local community through a public participation in science framework to generate information to inform the development of predation risk maps. In addition, the local community will be surveyed to better understand their interest for a Carnivore Predation Early Warning System (CPEWS) and other mitigation techniques that will promote co-existence between livestock production and carnivore conservation. The proposed methodology includes the development of predation risk maps, community engagement in the process and informal community surveys to help build solutions to reduce the number of interactions and build tolerance toward carnivore species. Because lions are the main predator of livestock in the area, we are using it as our test species.

Dr. Susan Miller
Susan Miller is a post-doctoral fellow in the Genetics Department of the University of Pretoria, based at the Veterinary Genetic Laboratory (VGL) where she is involved in conservation genetics project for various African species (including lions). She completed her doctorate in the Department of Nature Conservation at Tshwane University of Technology in Pretoria, South Africa in 2014. Her research for her DTech focused on the management of lions on small reserves (<1000 km2) which has close ties to the goals of the Lion Management Forum (LiMF). Specifically she explored the reasons for higher growth rates of these populations compared to more open systems. She then developed a model to simulate contraception options that could be used to reduce these growth rates. Susan also standardised a set of microsatellite markers for use in southern African lions. Using these microsatellites, she explored the genetic origins and current genetic status of these small reserve populations. Susan is an active member of LiMF and is involved in the development of a Biodiversity Management Plan (BMP) for lions in South Africa.

Dr. Hans Bauer
Born in 1969 in The Hague, The Netherlands, I consider myself a global citizen, having worked for Dutch, Belgian and British institutions and having lived and worked in several African countries. I’m currently living in Addis Abeba, Ethiopia, from where I’m setting up lion research and conservation activities in West and Central Africa for WildCRU, University of Oxford
I obtained my MSc in 1994 and my PhD in 2003, both from the Centre of Environmental Studies, Leiden University, The Netherlands. My dissertation was entitled “Lion conservation in West and Central Africa. Integrating social and natural science for wildlife conflict resolution around Waza National Park, Cameroon”. From 1995 to 2001 I coordinated the Centre of Environment and Development studies in Cameroon, a research centre with a dozen PhD-fellows. From 2004 to 2007 I coordinated courses at Leiden University for staff affiliated to the Garoua Wildlife College. In 2002 I was involved in the creation of the West and Central African Lion Conservation Network, ROCAL (www.rocal-lion.org).

From 2008 to 2013 I was country representative of VLIR UOS in Ethiopia, a Belgian organisation for international cooperation in higher education. I facilitated academic partnerships, with over 100 PhD projects, many in the field of natural resource management. I’m still involved in capacity building and in nature conservation across Ethiopia.

At WildCRU, my aim is to develop lion research and conservation in West and Central Africa. My focus is on conflict resolution and on protected area management. In this region, where the wildlife sector is much less developed than in southern Africa, this means doing basic work.

Dr. Laura Bertola
I’m affiliated as a researcher at Leiden University, the Netherlands, currently working on a project on metagenomics. Before, I have worked on the distribution of genetic diversity in the lion, using a range of genetic markers, including mitogenomes, microsatellites and genome-wide SNPs. We have explored different sources of DNA e.g. by non-invasively collecting hair and scat samples and by using ancient DNA approaches for specimens in natural history collections. This led to a PhD thesis with the title ‘Genetic diversity in the lion (Panthera leo (Linnaeus 1758)): Unravelling the Past and Prospects for the Future’. I’m particularly interested in how the rapidly developing field of genetics and genomics can contribute to the field of conservation biology. These data provide a rational basis for prioritising populations for conservation efforts, but also give insight into evolutionary drivers which may have contributed to the current genetic make-up. Phylogeographic data can contribute to defining management strategies, both for in situ conservation and for breeding of captive stocks. Currently we are exploring possibilities for high-throughput genotyping of lions (and other felids) for application in conservation programmes.

Dr. Gus Mills
Now officially retired from SANParks I am mainly involved with writing up the results of a six year study on cheetahs in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park. The bulk of the data will be presented in a book titled “Kalahari Cheetahs: adaptations to an arid environment”, due for completion in 2016. A few papers on specific topics will also be written.

Mr. Colin Wenham
I work for The Malilangwe Trust and along with my colleagues we manage The Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve. This is a 400 km2 protected area situated in the south eastern lowveld of Zimbabwe. The reserve was established in 1994. The Malilangwe Trust, is a donor-funded, non-profit organisation that aims to conserve wildlife and improve social welfare through investment in the surrounding communities. A principal objective of the Trust is to restore and maintain the reserve’s historic biodiversity. While it is recognised that irreversible local and regional changes prevent the ecosystem from ever being fully returned to its historic state, there are ecological processes and elements of biodiversity that can be successfully reinstated.

Ms. Shivani Bhalla
Ewaso Lions is an independent wildlife conservation organization in northern Kenya. Our mission is to conserve Kenya’s lions and other large carnivores by promoting coexistence between people and wildlife. Our goal is to maintain connectivity for lions through key parts of their remaining range, and improve the livelihoods of people sharing the landscape with lions through the reduction of human-lion conflict.

Human-lion coexistence and conflict mitigation in our study area (Samburu, Laikipia, and Isiolo Counties in northern Kenya) cannot be achieved without engaging the local people but we believe these activities must be based on, and verified by, rigorous science. We combine two approaches to achieve our goals 1) a community participatory approach, and 2) a pure research approach.

Community participatory approach – Our study represents a mosaic of different land-use types and involves working with different stakeholders from Samburu pastoralist communities to large-scale commercial ranchers. Our conservation programs are designed to engage key decision makers on each land-use type in ways that allows them to participate in lion conservation (through lion tracking, data collection, better livestock protection, and education) whilst fulfilling their traditional roles and responsibilities in their work and community. Warriors and elders are engaged in the Samburu community through our flagship Warrior Watch and Wazee Watch programs, land-owners and ranch managers in the commercial ranches, and guides and operators at the tourism lodges through our Lion Watch program.

Research – we collect data through a combination of high tech activities such as GPS collars and camera trapping, and through warriors and scouts on the ground. Research goals are twofold: 1) to validate the effectiveness of conservation activities through monitoring population trends, human-lion conflict trends and attitudes of the communities involved; 2) to better understand the movements and ecology of lions living in human dominated landscapes, thus identifying areas where long term connectivity may be most effectively achieved. Where possible, validation of programs is done by external researchers – Warrior Watch and Lion Kids Camps evaluations.

w.ewasolions.org” www.ewasolions.org (www.ewasolions.org) for more details on our conservation programs and research activities. Shivani Bhalla, Alayne Cotterill, and Paul Thomson.

Mr. Dereck Joubert
Chairman and founder of the Big Cats Initiative that funds over 75 projects in 25 countries. Recipient of 9 Emmy Awards, a Peabody, World Ecology Award and Presidential Order of Merit (Botswana) Recently received an Outstanding Achievement Award from the Jackson Hole Wildlife Films Festival (previous recipients were Alan Rabinovich, Richard Leakey).
Currently working on BCI granting, a film on young nomadic lions, research on young male lions from 2 years old to adulthood and another on elephants for PBS and Nature.
Dereck is also founder and CEO of Great Plains Conservation a private company that takes threatened land and converts it to non-hunting, passive use high end tourism in some cases. Presently Great Plains manages nearly 1,000,000 acres of land in Botswana and Kenya and runs camps: Mara Plains, Mara Toto, Zarafa, Selinda Reserve, Selinda Explorer’s camp, Duba Plains and ol Donyo Lodge. He is Chairman of the associated Great Plains Foundation that generates funding for communities that live in association with lions.
Dereck is also on the board of WildAid, Great Plains Foundation, and The Big Life Foundation. He is starting a Chinese film production company and NGO to be able to talk directly to the major wildlife trade markets about stopping wildlife trade.  He is engaged in moving 100 rhinos from South Africa to safe havens in Botswana.

Dr. Sam Ferreira
SANParks have a complex and integrated set of requirements and research aim to support these.  It basically collapses into two requirements with the one for large parks having two subsets of challenges:

LARGE PARKS: challenges associated with large parks and relative dense populations (Kruger); and challenges associated with large parks and relative low densities (e.g. Kgalagadi Transfrontier Parks)

SMALL PARKS: challenges associated with small parks.

Our response is simple – restore ecological processes where you have the luxury of space – large parks.  Mimic the outcomes of ecological processes where you do not have the luxury of space – small parks.  Within this brief context I paste a broad framework and example of the projects associated with carnivore in Kruger to illustrate the integrated management and research approach that SANParks have taken.  The broad framework is what my tasks associated with carnivores focus on. There are several abbreviations, but I do not think the detail is that important. Note that the lion programme in Kruger will within the next 2 years evolve into surveillance and monitoring programme – no need to invest into research when in fact the problem is low priority.

Dr. Paul Funston
Paul Funston recently took over as Senior Director: Lion Program for Panthera and is really enjoying the challenge. Panthera addresses lion conservation issues at multiple levels of government through to community engagement, with initiatives focussing on policy (including trophy hunting), conflict mitigation, bushmeat and population surveys. The policy initiative currently largely addresses trophy monitoring and age-based hunting restrictions in four of the key lion hunting countries. To address conflict and bushmeat Panthera largely partners with existing programs, bringing technical expertise and funding. We are trying to commit to at least five key sites for each, chosen for the value to lion conservation of each site and the suitability of the program partner. Surveys are an on-going component of Panthera’s program, both to assess populations in areas where they have not previously been surveyed, but also to monitor the population trends in programs with whom we partner.

Paul is now based in the Zambezi Region (formerly Caprivi) of Namibia, allowing Panthera the opportunity to implement a conflict mitigation program there aimed at ensuring the persistence of resident lions, while also ensuring that the area allows for cross border movements of lions in the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA). Paul will also help facilitate lion surveys in area of KAZA, such as West Zambezi and south-eastern Angola.

Dr. Bruce Patterson
I study the evolution, ecology and distribution of tropical mammals.  I have field programs in South America and Africa, studying rats, bats, and cats.  My work in Kenya has focused on two projects: 1) The Lions of Tsavo and 2) The Bats of Kenya.

Work on Tsavo lions commenced with an investigation of Kenya’s legendary man-eaters, including hypotheses on why they turned into man-eaters and estimating the actual human toll of their depredations.  This work spawned a field program, which ran from 2002 through 2009, studying the ecology and behaviour of Tsavo lions in the wooded ranch lands that surround Kenya’s biggest national parks.  There we documented patterns of livestock depredation and estimated that each of these lions incurred only $290 in damages annually, a mere pittance in view of their enormous value to ecotourism and park visitation.  We also documented numerous differences in the ecology and behaviour of woodland lions compared to those living in open grasslands.  Studies in Tsavo were also part of more wide-ranging studies of lion genetics throughout their range, conducted in collaboration with Dr Jean Dubach and others.

Dr. Cole Burton

I am a conservation biologist and wildlife ecologist with broad interests in using science to inform biodiversity conservation and environmental management.  I work as a Research Scientist with Alberta Innovates-Technology Futures and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Biology Department at the University of Victoria, Canada. My research centres on the applied ecology of terrestrial mammal populations and their habitats, with a particular focus on protecting, restoring and managing carnivore communities. I am also keenly interested in sampling and analytical  methodologies for effective monitoring of rare and elusive carnivores. I have studied lion population trends in Mole National Park, Ghana, and worked with colleagues to highlight the dire status of lions in West Africa, and to evaluate the effectiveness of lion conservation strategies.

Dr. Ilaria Di Silvestre

I studied Biology in Padova, Italy, where I completed in 1995 my thesis about the ecology of red foxes. Ten days later that, I leaved for Africa, where I’ve lived until 2008. Between 1995 and 1997 I worked for the Zoological Society “La Torbiera” in Niokolo – Badiar Transboundary Park (Senegal and Guinea Conakry) studying wild dogs and other big carnivore’s density and distribution. After that I spent three years in Egypt, in Wadi El Rayan Natural Protectorate, as IUCN coordinator of the ecological monitoring activities. From 2001 to 2008 I’ve worked in the Pendjari – W Biosphere Reserves, between Benin, Burkina Faso and Niger. Here I made studies about the big carnivore’s ecology, specially focusing on lion populations monitoring and I was charged by the ECOPAS-W Regional Park Programme of the realisation of an ecological monitoring system for the W Regional Park. Since August 2008 I’m based in Rome, Italy, and I’m working for the European Commission as consultant evaluator of biodiversity projects for the European Union Life+ programme. I was also consultant for Terra Incognita, a Documentary Production Company focused on wildlife and environmental issues.

I am currently Project Leader Advocacy Wildlife at Eurogroup for Wildlife and Laboratory Animals.

Ms. Paola Bouley
I am an ecologist by training and by passion.  I was born and raised in South Africa and earned a B.S. with honours in Biology from University of California at Santa Cruz (2001) and an M.S. in Ecology and Systematic Biology from the Romberg Tiburon Centre for Environmental Studies and San Francisco State University (2005).  In 2012 I founded the Gorongosa Lion Project and began my doctoral research focused on large carnivore recovery and conservation in Central Mozambique with Dr. Chris Wilmers at UC Santa Cruz in 2014.

I am currently the Director of Projecto Leões da Gorongosa/Gorongosa Lion Project based at the E. O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory at Gorongosa National Park, and an NGS Big Cat Initiative grantee.

Mr. John J. Jackson, III
Is the Chairman of Conservation Force which is a non-profit NGO that is a member of IUCN, a CITES International Observer and UN Observer, et al. with volunteer board members and specialists that are or have been members of the IUCN Cat Specialist Group from its inception. It has had lion conservation projects across all of Africa, from Benin to RSA. This has included participation in the regional lion action planning workshops and funding of the national lion action plans, including many local plans in communal and private conservancies. Projects include funding lion population estimate research in Kruger National Park to periodic community quota setting in the communal conservancies of Namibia. Conservation Force has also been active in cheetah, jaguar and leopard projects as well as other species from rhino and elephant in Africa to markhor in Pakistan. John is a member of the Sustainable Use and Livelihoods Specialist Group of IUCN, was the President of the Sustainable Use Commission of CIC for more than a decade, and is a member of similar committees of The Wildlife Society and the Fish and Wildlife Association. Hence, sustainable use is utilized to motivate local authorities and communities, generate operating revenue and create infrastructure for lion management and conservation. Generally, the projects have proven to be successful in maintaining and restoring habitat, prey and lion.

Mr. Nic Elliot
The Mara Lion Project

Principal Researcher: Nic Elliot

Co-workers: Niels Mogensen, Kasaine Sankan, Dominic Sakat

Study area: Masai Mara National Reserve; group ranches of Naikarra, Maji Moto, Siana and Olderkesi; private and community conservancies of Mara North Conservancy, Olare Orok Conservancy, Motorogi Conservancy, Naboisho Conservancy, Lemek Conservancy, Ol Chorro Conservancy and Ol Kinyei Conservancy.

Date started: 2013

Academic institutions: WildCRU, University of Oxford
Academic collaborations: Prof. David Macdonald, Director of WildCRU
Affiliated institutions: Kenya Wildlife Trust, WWF, AWF, Tony Lapham Predator Hub, Mara Cheetah Project

Summary: “The Kenya Wildlife Service estimates that there are fewer than 2,000 lions left in the country today, with an annual decline of 100 lions. Increasing human populations, coupled with diminishing natural prey and habitats has brought lions into close proximity with people. The Greater Mara ecosystem represents a unique study area where lions, prey, people and livestock exist at very high densities. The extent to which they co-exist is largely unknown. The main aim of the Mara Lion Project is to sustainably conserve lions throughout the Greater Mara Ecosystem by determining their current status, identifying the major threats that could be causing declines in the current lion population and mitigating these threats wherever possible.

Prof. Dr. Hans De Iongh
Hans de Iongh is an associate professor at Leiden University since 1990 and a guest professor at Antwerp university since 2009.

Hans has  been involved in research on human-wildlife conflicts in Africa and Asia for over  40 years. Besides being a member of the ALWG from the early start, he is a member of the IUCN Cat specialist group and of the Steering Committee of the IUCN Species Survival Commission since 2009.

He has been Chair of the Netherlands Committee for IUCN during 1990 until 2000, Co-Chair during 2000-2003 and served as a regional Councillor for West Europe during 2008-2012. He has a broad experience with international biodiversity policy and practice. He participated as delegation member in COP of the CBD, CITES and Ramsar during consecutive years.

He has been a member of the Netherlands CITES Commission, Chair of the Van Tienhoven Foundation and member of an Advisory Group to the Ministry of LNV on Red Lists in the Netherlands.

He has been active in the development of a regional strategy and action plan for lions in N W and C Africa and in the development of national lion conservation strategies and action plans in the same region. He has also been involved in the harmonization of regional Red Lists and contributed to and initiated several National Conservation Strategies for threatened species and Red Listing in Europe.

Dr. Charles T. T. Edwards
Profile: I work towards the development of methods that allow sustainable harvest of renewable, biological resources, with particular focus on marine fisheries. This requires a creative approach to the analysis of dynamic systems, applying skills in mathematics, statistics and the computer sciences. The products of my research are frequently carried over into an applied setting, through consultation with clients in the governmental, non-governmental and commercial sectors. My research work has included terrestrial hunting systems, specifically the African lion (Panthera leo) and mountain nyala antelope (Tragelaphus buxtoni).

Current work position: Fisheries Scientist, Fisheries Modelling Group, NIWA Ltd., Wellington, New Zealand. Previous work position: Imperial College Conservation Science Group, Imperial College London, Ascot, United Kingdom.

Professor David Macdonald CBE DSc FRSE
WildCRU Director

Wildlife Conservation Fellow: Lady Margaret Hall

In brief an accurate, if somewhat colourless biography, might say  that I am Oxford University’s first Professor of Wildlife Conservation. It might also note that I conceived, and implemented the appeal which led, after all too many years of struggle, to the foundation of the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit in 1986. In addition to directing the WildCRU I hold a Research Fellowship in Wildlife Conservation at Lady Margaret Hall, and was  deeply involved in creating this, the first Fellowship in any British university dedicated to biological conservation, just as the WildCRU was also the first such research unit.

My scientific background is in behavioural ecology, with an emphasis on carnivores, although my research has spanned published studies on organisms from moths to penguins and even, occasionally, plants. As both the WildCRU, and the whole field of conservation, have evolved, our work has become inter-disciplinary. More recently my biological writings are increasingly enmeshed in issues of environmental policy, economics and research strategy.

Dr. Andrew Loveridge
Kaplan Research Fellow Lady Margaret Hall

I’m a wildlife biologist and the Kaplan Research Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University. I completed my D.Phil. at Oxford University in 1999, and have been a member of the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit since 1994.

I spent the last ten years running a research and conservation project on African lions in north-western Zimbabwe giving me extensive field experience working on African carnivores. I am co-editor of The Biology and Conservation of Wild Felids and I have written a number of peer reviewed papers and book chapters on the behavioural ecology and conservation of African jackals and lions (including co-authoring one of the case study chapters in The Biology and Conservation of Wild Canids).

I am a member of the IUCN/SSC Canid Specialist Group and African Lion Working Group and recently contributed to the IUCN working paper on the impact of trophy hunting of African lions. In addition I co-edited three volumes of proceedings from a series of Lion Conservation Research workshops (2001, 2002, 2005).

I am a career wildlife biologist and conservationist. My current research includes a study of lion ecology, behaviour and conservation management in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe and the surrounding safari hunting concessions and a GIS based meta-analysis which aims to model lion population dynamics and spatial distribution in sub-Saharan Africa.

Recent work, funded by the Panthera Foundation, has focused on understanding the human-lion conflict along the boundary of Hwange National Park to establish the nature and extent of the problem and to help develop practical solutions for those communities that co-exist with wild carnivores.

Ms. Tammy Hoth
AfriCat Foundation, Namibia

For the past ten years the increased rainfall in the otherwise semi-arid regions of north-west Namibia resulted in increased lion distribution as well as greater livestock herds; efforts by various NGOs to mitigate the farmer-lion conflict in Namibia’s wilderness areas, which comprise the communal conservancies, were rewarded by a perceived increased tolerance of lions; unfortunately,  since the onset of drought conditions since 2012 coupled with a marked drop in tourism, retaliatory killings have increased.

AfriCat’s Communal Carnivore Conservation Programme (CCCP) has, for some time, seen a change in mind-set in some conservancies, who have managed to maintain their livestock protection methods despite hardship; the CCCP Lion Guardians effectively monitor lion movement and related conflict close to the Etosha National Park borders, reporting on ‘hot-spots’ where AfriCat’s assistance is required.

The Africat Hobatere Lion Research Project is underway, with the first lioness collared recently; apart from establishing numbers and movement patterns, this project aims at supporting conflict management on adjacent communal farmland.

AfriCat’s Environmental Education projects on communal farmland involve the youth as well as farmers & game guards.

Ms. Yolan Friedmann,

CEO Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT);

Yolan Friedmann is currently the CEO of the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT), one of the largest conservation NGOs in southern Africa. Yolan has a background in Veterinary Nursing (Onderstepoort Veterinary Faculty, University of Pretoria), a BA in English and Communications (UNISA), an MSc in Environmental Studies (WITS) and an MDP (Programme for Management Development) from the Gordon Institute for Business Science (University of Pretoria).

Yolan is a member of the Golden Key International Honour Society and is a Certified Director by the Institute of Directors SA. Yolan was the first female recipient of the SAB Nick Steele Environmentalist of the Year award which she won in 2011. She was also the winner of the CEO Most Influential Woman in Business and Environment award in 2012 in the Environmental category, as well as the recipient of the 2012 Green Globe award.

Dr. Harriet Davies-Mostert

Head of Conservation Science EWT

Dr. Kelly Marnewick,

Programme Manager: Carnivore Conservation Programme EWT

The Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) is dedicated to conserving threatened species and ecosystems in southern Africa to the benefit of all people.  As one of South Africa’s leading biodiversity conservation organisations, the EWT is striving to facilitate the protection and sustainable use of key ecosystems. The EWT has a cohesive and integrated approach to the conservation of species, habitats and ecosystem processes and we therefore focus much of our work on protecting both threatened species and habitats.

Successful conservation thus means protecting the habitats that support species – and human beings – and in this way entire ecosystems, communities and socio-economic structures reap the benefits.

The EWT believes that sustainable conservation requires inclusive approaches, to not only address biodiversity objectives, but also the interests of the people and industries relying on the ecosystems services. This we do by developing innovative and adaptive conservation and management solutions, aligned and compatible with the broader economic and social imperatives of the region.

Dr. Norman John Monks, MSc, PhD.

I worked in the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority from 1977 to 2014 as Ecologist and Park Manager.  I was stationed in Hwange National Park, Nyanga National Park,  Mushandike Sanctuary (domesticated eland and FMDF buffalo project), at Kyle Recreational Park in charge of Game Ranching Research, Mana Pools National Park as ecologist and Park Manager, Gonarezhou National Park in the same category and finally at Matopos National Park.  I retired from Parks on 1st February 2014 and joined African Lion and Environmental Research Trust.

In terms of academic and field work I carried out a study on white rhino in Kyle Recreational Park which led to an MSc and a study on lions in Mana Pools National Park which led to a PhD.

In my present post as CEO of African Lion and Environmental Research Trust, I am involved in all aspects of the Trust’s social, research and lion rehabilitation programs.  By far the most important focus of the Trust is an integrated approach to conservation which entails field work as well as outreach to communities.  Our research programs include lion research by Rae Kokeš in Matusadona National Park, Biodiversity studies in Zambezi National Park including large carnivore studies and the lion rehabilitation program at Antelope Park.

African Lion and Environmental Research Trust is a fairly new organisation and as such is striving to learn from its mistakes, improve and professionalise.  The Trust hopes to make a contribution to lion conservation as well as in other fields recognising it’s small contribution to the conservation community as a whole.

Mr. Kiki Martial

I did a Postgraduate Diploma in International Wildlife Conservation at the University of Oxford (WildCRU), where I developed new technical and analytical skills necessary for wildlife conservation. Previously, I worked as a research assistant at the Laboratory of Applied Ecology
in Benin where I have been working on wildlife conservation and forest genetic resources conservation. I gained field experiences on habitat and wildlife surveys mainly in the W-Arly-Pendjari Complex (WAP-COM) in West Africa. I started drawing my interest to lion in particular and large carnivores in WAP-COM after I was involved in lion collaring and monitoring in the Pendjari NP. Thereafter, I got more opportunities to work in large carnivore survey alongside conservationists from Panthera and WAP-COM. Beside my passion for nature I also enjoy training local and international future ecologists and work with rural communities surrounding PAs to mitigating Human Wildlife Conflict.

Mr. Brent Stapelkamp

“The Long Shields project, Hwange Lion research.

Currently I am the manager of the Long Shields project, the Hwange version of the Lion Guardians of Amboseli. I have been on the Hwange lion project for 8 and a half years now and apart from running the community conflict work I also do a lot of the baseline ecological fieldwork including darting and collaring of lions. I am 37 years old and live here with my wife Laurie and son Oliver in our new home in the Mabale communal lands adjacent to Hwange National Park.”

Dr Philipp Henschel

Staff board of directors advisory council Cat Advisory Council

Survey Coordinator, Lion Program

Starting in 2009, Philipp Henschel joined Panthera full-time as the Lion Program Regional Coordinator within West and Central Africa. Originally from Germany, Philipp is now based in Gabon, where he has lived for more than ten years, and from where he currently fulfils his position as Panthera’s Lion Survey Coordinator. Most recently, Philipp conducted lion field surveys in the Sahelian savannahs of Nigeria and Côte d’Ivoire, and further surveys are planned in Senegal, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Tanzania.

Read the survey results: Lion status updates from five range countries in West and Central Africa

Prior to joining Panthera, Philipp held a long list of positions within the wildlife conservation field, mainly in Central Africa. Starting in 1998 in Gabon, he began work as a Biological Advisor for the World Wide Fund for Nature before joining the ranks of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). In 2000-2006, Philipp served as the Principal Investigator in the WCS Great Cats Program’s Forest Leopard Study. During this period, most of his work focused on leopards, a wild cat that has received little scientific attention in Central Africa. However, since 2003, he also repeatedly acted as Expedition Leader for WCS and Panthera surveys on lion populations in the forest-savannah landscapes in Gabon, the Republic of Congo and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Ms. Lise Hanssen

Has been involved in large carnivore conservation in Namibia since 1992. Her first inroads were the translocation and management of cheetahs and leopards on Namibian commercial farmland.  In 1998 Lise started a radio-tracking study to assess the outcome of translocating problem leopards into new areas.  This was followed by her first real experiences with lions in the Kunene Region in north-west Namibia and in Etosha. The focus of the Kunene Lion Project was to assess the population status, ecology and recovery of the desert-adapted lions of the Namib Desert.

In 2007, Lise shifted her focus to spotted hyaenas, also looking at their role in human-wildlife conflict in the Zambezi Region (formerly known as the Caprivi) of Namibia.  In contrast to all expectations, Lise found that they were far less abundant than was claimed in the area.  In recent times Lise has expanded the Kwando Carnivore Project to include population monitoring of all large carnivores and conflict mitigation with lions, which is a major issue of conservation concern in the region. In all her endeavours Lise partners with Ministry of Environment and Tourism, NGO’s and other bodies to achieve her goals.

Professor Claudio Sillero

I am a conservation biologist based at Oxford, with an interest on threatened carnivores and disease dynamics. Increasingly, I am focusing in the relationships between wildlife and rural communities, the mitigation of conflict between wildlife and human interests, and biodiversity conservation policy and practices. Most of my career has had an African flavour, having worked in Ethiopia, Kenya, Mozambique, Niger, and Senegal. I have a current involvement in the status of lion populations in Ethiopia and West Africa, where I have been engaged in the preparation of national lion action plans for Benin, Cameroon and Senegal, as well as on conservation strategies for cheetah and African wild dogs.

Dr. Vivienne Williams

The broad themes of my research interest are ethnobotany, ethnoecology and the trade and conservation of African traditional medicine. Current areas of research include: a) Red Listing, risk assessment, and threats to medicinal plants; b) the ethnobotany, ethnoecology and distribution of the root holoparasite Hydnora abyssinica, especially in Zimbabwe; c) using ethno-ecological information collected from medicinal plant markets and rural resource users to assess the condition of resources in the wild; d) the use and trade of an animals for traditional medicine; e) the trade in alien plant species for traditional medicine; h) researching the life histories and scientific contributions of ‘Watt & Breyer-Brandwijk – Southern Africa’s pioneers of ethnopharmacology; i) the trade in lion bones from South Africa to Asia.

Mr Jason Riggio

While at Duke University, Jason worked under the direction of Drs. Stuart Pimm and Luke Dollar as Lead GIS Analyst for the National Geographic Big Cats Initiative (BCI). He designed his masters project around the group’s first deliverable; an analysis of lion populations including distribution, abundance and habitat corridors in sub-Saharan Africa. He is the lead author on the study, published in Biodiversity and Conservation. In addition, he presented their findings at the Society for Conservation Biology annual conference and at the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s African Lion Endangered Species Act Listing Workshop. He was also part of a team of students awarded a BCI Small Grant to survey a lion population in Tete Province, Mozambique, a region where the status of lions was uncertain. Currently Jason is in pursuit of a Ph.D. in Ecology at the University of California, Davis with Dr. Tim Caro as his advisor. He helped develop a novel program to map land conversion using high-resolution satellite imagery, and is applying this data to map wildlife corridors across the whole of Tanzania.

Mr Andrew Jacobson

Began big cat research while a Masters student at Duke University under the direction of Drs. Stuart Pimm and Luke Dollar conducting research for National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative. The Big Cats Initiative provided a more focused and exciting goal than previously as a general biology student and Andrew became engrossed in the thorny, interdisciplinary issues of large carnivore conservation.

As Coordinator of the interns group at Duke University, Andrew worked on assessing African lion population status and distribution. Andrew assisted in modelling the species’ range loss through history, investigating CITES and the lion bone trade, and analysing lion hunting areas. Work culminated early in 2013 with an African lion population status update published in Biological Conservation.

As Coordinator, Andrew was also involved in several international field experiences. Andrew and a small team were awarded a grant for a lion distributional survey in a previously unsurveyed area of northwest Mozambique. While in the field, the team conducted call-up stations and questionnaire surveys to assess lion presence. Andrew also assisted in lion conservation via Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld’s conflict resolution efforts in Tanzania and detailed Anne Kent Taylor’s efforts to reinforce bomas in the greater Mara.

Andrew is currently an MPhil/PhD student under Dr. Sarah Durant at the Zoological Society of London. His current interests are fourfold: modelling species distributions and their applicability in endangered species management, exploring connectivity modelling processes and their relationship to reality, spatial modelling of human-carnivore conflicts and the ability to identify conflict hotspots, and lastly, understanding perceptions of human-wildlife conflict and how they influence carnivore conservation. Andrew’s career goal is to support the preservation of large carnivores.

Mr Andrei Snyman

Andrei Snyman is head of the Northern Tuli Predator Project in eastern Botswana. His research focuses on the behavioural ecology and population dynamics of large African carnivores, and the conservation of the species.

Dr Ross Barnett

After completing a D.Phil. in the ancient DNA of felids at the University of Oxford, I moved away from large carnivores and undertook a number of post-doctoral studies in the population genetics of a variety of other wild mammal species. Despite projects on voles, pigs, dolphins and others I have maintained a strong interest in the felidae, and in particular on the lion. I continue to use ancient DNA to access species information locked up in the remnants of extinct populations and subspecies with the hope of furthering our understanding of lion demography and evolution.”

Dr Charles T. T. Edwards

My research is focused on the development and application of strategies to sustainably manage exploited species, both marine and terrestrial. Much of this work comes under the heading of management strategy evaluation, accounting for both biological and socio-economic uncertainty to develop statistically robust frameworks for harvest. Examples of this work include the bioeconomic evaluation of enforcement and assessment methods for the South Georgia toothfish fishery, and development of a data-poor harvest regime for lion hunting concessions in Africa. I also have a continued interest in spatial management, particularly the assessment of marine protected areas using dynamic population models, and have developed and applied appropriate methods to do this.

Dr Charles Musyoki

The Head of Species Management, Kenya Wildlife Service, Dr Charles Musyoki noted that human encroachment is largely to blame for a decline in population of Grevy’s Zebra in the northern rangelands.

Mr Christiaan and Mrs Hanlie Winterbach

We are maintaining our long-term monitoring in the south west Okavango Delta (wpt Ng29_30) that started in 1997. We have two student projects looking at the impact of habitat changes in the seasonal floodplains that occurred since 1997, on prey populations and lion demography. We are working on carnivore conflict around Habu village, on the western side of the Okavango Delta,  We extended our monitoring to include the dry woodland of NG43 to the east of the Delta. We are busy analysing and writing up articles on the landscape suitability of Botswana to conserve large carnivores and the status of large carnivores in Botswana.

Dr Dennis Ikanda

Principal Research Officer for the Kingupira Wildlife Research Centre at the Selous Game Reserve in Tanzania.

Dr Emily Fitzherbert

Worldwide, lions encounter a slew of mounting dangers- everything from habitat destruction to hunting. Around Katavi National Park, Western Tanzania, the situation is unique. Whereas in many pockets of Africa lions are killed for preying on poorly protected livestock, in Katavi, lions are hunted as a result of cultural exploitation and manipulation.

The traditions of the Sukuma, agro-pastoralists who now live in around Katavi, reward those that kill lions in response to livestock loss. As no livestock are taken by lions in the area, these traditional rewards are incentivizing some to illegally hunt lions within park limits simply for the economic gain.

Emily Fitzherbert, conservation biologist and National Geographic Explorer, has developed a program based in Western Tanzania helping to mitigate unjust killings such as these. With her Tanzania counterpart, Peter Genda, they are empowering the community to question the circumstances in which the lion was killed and so refuse to reward those who hunted the lion in Katavi. Working in the villages around Katavi, they assist the community in drawing up a strict set of village bylaws condemning illegal lion hunting and provide training for grassroot implementation of these bylaws by members of a traditional Sukuma institution, the Sungusungu.

Dr Glyn Maude

Project General Objective: General and logistical support of the CKGR Research Group.  The Central Kalahari Game Reserve Project is an umbrella research organisation that coordinates wildlife research projects in Botswana. Dr. Glynn Maude, a post-doctorate researcher manages this organisation. KCL supports a number of CKGRRG research efforts. Glynn and his team of senior researchers understand the necessity of mentoring Motswana students at masters’ degree level to ensure that these talented students achieve their goals of becoming PhD students and the future conservation leaders of Botswana.

Makgadikgadi Pans Lion Research Project. Principal Researchers: Keitumetse Ngaka and CKGR Research Group. Partners:  The CKGR Research Group and Kanabo Conservation Link.

Location: Makgadikgadi and Nxai Pans National Park and the Surrounding area Project General Objective: To find out the effect of fence and river on the level of Human Lion Conflict (HLC) along Boteti river.

Mr Gosiame Neo-Mahupeleng

Participatory Carnivore – Human Conflict Mitigation in the Chobe Enclave with Emphasis on Livestock Husbandry Practices.

The aim of the project is to come up with data and information through a participatory process that can be used to address/mitigate human-carnivore conflict, and hence enhance conservation of large carnivore and improve communal livelihoods through reduced human-carnivore conflict. This project by the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) intends to look at problem analysis of human-carnivore conflict in the Chobe Enclave communal area of Botswana. The project will come up with a new approach to addressing human-carnivore conflict; a participatory problem analysis and an all stakeholder mitigation strategy. The proposed project will focus on all large mammalian large carnivore species inclusive of larger than black backed jackal by body size, this being lion, leopard, spotted hyaena and wild dog. The project will be on a multidisciplinary approach; community liaison, telemetry, ecology, socioeconomic analysis.

Mr Gus van Dyk

Director of Conservation, Tswalu Kalahari Game Reserve.

Mr Jan Broekhuis

Over 30 years of experience in rural development, conservation, natural resource management, park and tourism planning and development as well as project planning and management in Africa. My work has focused on integrating sustainable use of natural resources into national development objectives in order to secure improved and sustained rural livelihoods, economic growth and enhance biodiversity conservation. I have extensive experience in project management, integrated land use planning, development and management of protected areas and their buffer zones including privatization, community based natural resource management, sustainable livelihoods, tourism planning and development, strengthening of human resource capacity, international collaboration in the planning, development and management of Transfrontier Conservation Areas, as well as policy and institutional development in developing countries.

I am now a freelance consultant.

Dr Jeremy Anderson

Director of International Conservation Services, Jeremy has almost 40 years’ experience in Wildlife Conservation. Starting as a Game Ranger in Zululand, he then became a biologist in the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Management in Zimbabwe working on game ranching and elephant and buffalo population management. He obtained his Ph.D. on the ecology of Nyala in Zululand and then worked on lion management in Umfolozi before becoming Director of Pilanesberg National Park, and then Director of the KaNgwane Parks Board (now the Mpumalanga Parks Board).

He has undertaken a variety of conservation projects in Africa (Angola, Botswana, South Africa, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Zambia) and further afield (Saudi Arabia, Syria, Sri Lanka, and China). He was a partner in an innovative ecotourism company and consults on nature-related tourism in Africa to a major international leisure group. His wide range of experience, particularly in evaluating, planning and managing protected areas and wildlife utilization projects, is a useful bridge between scientists and field managers. He has published 30 scientific papers.

Mr Jeremy Goss

I have the wonderful luck of being made in Africa. A continent not without its faults, but pulsing with energy and host to a spectrum of truly spectacular wilderness areas. I had the privilege of growing up in some of these remote environments, and count myself fortunate to know the places that make me happiest. Photography is a passion, and one that I take seriously. But wild African spaces, and doing something to ensure that our generation leaves some of them behind, is something that I intend to spend my life working on. I am recently educated as a conservation biologist, and at present am doing research on a predator conservation program in the Amboseli-Tsavo ecosystem of Kenya.

I am currently working on finishing a paper looking at the impacts of carnivore conflict mitigation methods, particularly the impact of a compensation scheme, here in Amboseli. Although publication shouldn’t necessarily mean anything, once I have a paper published in the carnivore conservation field then I hope to be slightly more vocal when appropriate.

Prof Kathleen A. Alexander

Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation. My research program is directed at exploring and understanding the factors that influence the emergence and persistence of emerging and re-emerging diseases at the human- wildlife interface. My program embraces a systems biology approach to ecosystem health integrated with public health, beginning within host – pathogen dynamics and extending to the rural livelihoods of communities living with wildlife, including the impact on ecosystem function and local communities themselves.

Ms Kristin Nowell

CAT founder and Executive Director, is the senior author and compiler of the IUCN SSC Cat Specialist Group’s primary information sources for the world’s wild cats, including the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and the Cat Action Plan.

Ms Lana Müller

Position held at Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust: Conservation Manager

Email: lmuller1985@gmail.com

Location:       S 02 ̊ 51′ 15″             /          E 37 ̊ 55′ 00″

Biography:

Lana has been extensively involved in carnivore research and community-based wildlife conservation in various national parks and conservation areas in Africa.

She was born in South Africa and obtained a BSc in Conservation Ecology at Stellenbosch University in South Africa followed by an MSc in Biodiversity and Sustainability at Leiden University in The Netherlands. She carried out research on lion-livestock conflict in Waza National Park in northern Cameroon and studied the genetic variation of lion populations in three conservation areas in southern Kenya (Tsavo National Park, Amboseli National Park and Maasai Mara National Reserve).

Since 2012, Lana has been working as Conservation Manager for Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust (Kuku Group Ranch, Southern Kenya) managing different conservation programs (community rangers, wildlife monitoring, predator compensation program, environmental education and the Kuku lion project). In this position Lana has also been part of the Lion Borderland Initiative. This joint initiative of a group of lion conservation organisations aims to improve protection of the lions of northern Tanzania and southern Kenya. For the past 2 years Lana has also been involved in the Nairobi Lion Project, collaring 4 lions in Nairobi National Park to study lion behaviour and lion-livestock conflict around Nairobi National Park.

Dr Laurence G. Frank

Living With Lions Project Director

Laurence has been a research associate at the University of California, Berkeley since 1984, first as part of the Berkeley Hyena Project and currently in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology.

He has worked on predators in Kenya for forty years, including twenty years studying the behavioural ecology and endocrinology of the spotted hyena before turning to conservation research.

Dr Ludwig Siefert

Dr. Siefert is a wildlife veterinarian and founding member and Team Leader of the Uganda Large Predator Project.  In addition, he is an Honorary Senior Lecturer at Makerere University’s Department of Wildlife & Animal Resources Management.  In his role at ULPP, Dr. Siefert monitors the health of animals in many of Uganda’s National parks, including Queen Elizabeth and Lake Mburo, with a particular focus on predators.

Dr. Siefert is originally from Germany, where he received his undergraduate degree in veterinary medicine.  His work on a postgraduate certificate led him to Uganda for research until he was forced to leave during the Idi Amin years.  Dr. Siefert later earned his master’s degree in Tropical Animal Production.  He returned to Uganda in 1990 and began teaching epidemiology, preventive medicine and public health at Makerere University, where he was a founding member of its Wildlife & Animal Resources Management Department.  He has also instructed for and collaborated with many US, Canadian, and European universities.

In addition to his wildlife vet and university lecturer responsibilities, Dr. Siefert is also spear-heading our conservation education and community-based conservation activities.

Dr. Siefert is passionate about Uganda’s wildlife and people and has shared his knowledge and passion by mentoring hundreds of Ugandan and International students over the years.  He is also generous of his time and knowledge with tourists to the parks in which he works.

Dr Luke Dollar

Associate Professor of Biology, Pfeiffer University & Research Associate, Duke University Primate Center.

Dr Nobuyuki Yamaguchi

Address                         Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences

College of Arts and Sciences, Qatar University

P.O.Box 2713

Doha, State of Qatar

Tel: Qatar (+974)-44034538

Fax: Qatar (+974)-44034531

E-Mail: yamaguchi@qu.edu.qa

Education

2000                       D.Phil. (Wildlife biology)

Department of Zoology and Lady Margaret Hall

University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Thesis title: The Basic Ecology and the Reproductive Biology of Feral American Mink in the Upper Thames

1992                       M.Sc. (Experimental endocrinology)

Pure and Applied Physics, Graduate School

of Science and Engineering

Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan

Thesis title: A Comparative Endocrinological Study on Faecal Sex Steroid Hormones of the Japanese Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonoca)

1990                       B.Sc. (Biology)

Department of Biology, School of Education

Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan

Research interests

1)      Evolution and conservation of the Felidae.

2)      Evolution of reproductive strategies in sexually reproducing organisms with special references to sexual conflict.

3)      Behavioural ecology of desert-adapted Ehiopian hedgehogs.

4)      How to bring more science into wildlife conservation.

Selected publications concerning the lion

Saragusty, J., Shavit-Meyrav, A., Yamaguchi, N., Nadler, R., Bdolah-Abram, T., Gibeon, L., Hildebrandt, TB. & Shamir, MH. (2014). Comparative skull analysis suggests species-specific captivity-related malformation in lions (Panthera leo). PLoS One 9: e94527.

Barnett, R., Yamaguchi, N., Shapiro, B., Ho, SYW., Barnes, I., Burger, J., Sabin, R., Werdelin, L., Cuisin, J. & Larson, G. (2014). Revealing the maternal demographic history of Panthera leo using ancient DNA and a spatially explicit genealogical analysis. BMC Evolutionary Biology 14: 70.

Black, SA., Fellous, A., Yamaguchi, N., and Roberts, D.L. (2013). Examining the extinction of Panthera leo in North Africa and its implications for lion conservation. PLoS One 8(4): e60174.

Black, S., Yamaguchi, N., Harland, A. & Groombridge, J. (2010). Maintaining the genetic health of putative Barbary lions in captivity: an analysis of Moroccan Royal Lions. European Journal of Wildlife Research 56:21-31.

Yamaguchi, N., Kitchener, A.C., Driscoll, C.A. & Macdonald, D.W. (2009). Divided infraorbital foramen in the lion (Panthera leo): its implications for colonisation history, population bottlenecks, and conservation of the Asian lion (P. l. persica). Contributions to Zoology 78: 77-83.

Yamaguchi, N., Kitchener, A.C., Gilissen, E. & Macdonald, D.W. (2009). Brain size of the lion (Panthera leo) and the tiger (P. tigris): Implications for intrageneric phylogeny, intraspecific differences, and the effects of captivity. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 98: 85-93.

Barnett, R., Shapiro, B., Barnes, I., Ho, S.Y.W., Burger, J., Yamaguchi, N., Higham, T.F.G., Wheeler, H.T., Rosendahl, W., Sher, A.V., Sotnikova, M., Kuznetsova, T., Baryshnikov, G.F., Martin, L.D., Harington, C.R., Burns, J.A. & Cooper, A. (2009). Phylogeography of lions (Panthera leo) reveals three distinct taxa and a late Pleistocene reduction in genetic diversity. Molecular Ecology 18: 1668-1677.

Barnett, R., Yamaguchi, N., Shapiro, B. & Sabin, R. (2008). Ancient DNA analysis indicates the first English lions originated from North Africa. Contributions to Zoology 77: 7-16.

Barnett, R., Yamaguchi, N., Shapiro, B. & Nijman, V. (2007). Using ancient DNA techniques to identify the origin of unprovenanced museum specimens, as illustrated by the identification of a 19th century lion from Amsterdam. Contributions to Zoology 76: 87-94.

Barnett, R., Yamaguchi, N., Barnes, I. & Cooper, A. (2006). The origin, current diversity, and future conservation of the modern lion (Panthera leo). Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 273: 2119-2125.

Barnett, R., Yamaguchi, N., Barnes, I. & Cooper, A. (2006). Lost population and preserving genetic diversity in the lion Panthera leo: implications for its ex situ conservation. Conservation Genetics 7: 507-514.

Yamaguchi, N. (2006). Revaluation of “generic” zoo lions. International Zoo News 53: 41-42.

Yamaguchi, N., Cooper, A., Werdelin, L. & Macdonald, D.W. (2004). Evolution of the mane and group-living in the lion (Panthera leo): a review. Journal of Zoology 263: 329-342.

Yamaguchi, N. & Haddane, B. (2002). The North African Barbary lion and the Atlas Lion Project. International Zoo News 49: 465-481.

Dr Stephanie Dolrenry

Dr. Stephanie Dolrenry is a conservation biologist who has been studying lions and working with pastoralist communities in East Africa for a decade. As a co-founder of the conservation group, Lion

Guardians, Stephanie works to develop innovative methodologies that link tested scientific approaches with traditional knowledge to systematically monitor and conserve lions in non-protected areas and enable pastoralists and lions to interact in a positive way. Her research focuses primarily on incorporating non-literate, traditional lion-killers into the monitoring of elusive low density lion populations in human and livestock-dominated areas. She also focuses on the broader application of dispersal, survival and metapopulation theory to the conservation of fragmented carnivore populations.

Dr Paula A. White

Paula A. White, PhD. Director, Zambia Lion Project. Senior Research Fellow, Center for Tropical Research, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, University of California, Los Angeles USA

Dr White is a wildlife biologist specializing in wild carnivores. After receiving a BS in biology from University of California Santa Barbara, she earned an MS in wildlife management and a PhD in biology from University of California, Berkeley. For her doctorate, White spent four years in Kenya’s Masai Mara studying the effects of maternal rank on cub mortality in spotted hyenas.

Since 2003, Dr. White’s primary research interests have been in Zambia with an initial focus on several species of small carnivores. However, following the proposal to transfer African lion to CITES Appendix I and amidst growing worldwide concerns for lion conservation, in 2004 Dr. White’s focus shifted to investigating Zambia’s virtually unstudied lion populations.

Of greatest interest have been the shy mostly non-habituated lions found outside of national parks, in the game management areas (GMAs) where sport hunting occurs. Zambia Lion Project has sampled and surveyed throughout most of Zambia’s active GMAs (marked by blue stars on the map). In addition, sampling has occurred throughout North and South Luangwa, Kafue, Sioma Ngwezi and Mweru Wa Ntipa National Parks as well as outlying areas where lion sightings continue to be reported.

Working closely with the hunting community, White has accessed the most remote portions of the GMAs, documenting presence/absence and pride demographics through sightings, tracks and other sign. Lions are attracted using recorded prey sounds, and DNA samples are collected with minimally invasive biopsy darts. Trophy lions are also sampled for DNA and their ages estimated using a series of phenotypic features. Dr. White continues to work closely with Zambia’s wildlife department (formerly Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA) to provide them with empirical data regarding their lion populations and promote science-based management. A seminal aspect of this work has been introducing the concept of age-based trophy selection for lion hunting in Zambia as a crucial component of sustainable off take.

Dr. White continues her research to improve aging techniques for wild lions. In addition, White engages with international governments, hunting fraternities and the general public to assist in educating professionals, hunters and non-hunters on the practicality of age-based trophy selection and the conservation value of sustainable utilization.

Dr Pricelia Tumenta

I am a conservation and wildlife biologist, trainer at the University of Dshang, Cameroon. In 2007, I began my PhD research with the University of Leiden in the Netherlands focused on lions in Waza NP. Work involved understanding lion ecology and human-lion interactions related to livestock depredation. This further led to community outreach and education on human-lion conflict mitigation; as well as capacity building in protected areas, targeting park eco-guards for effective security patrols as an NGS BCI grantee.

I have been actively involved in the development of the national strategy for human-wildlife conflict mitigation and the national action plan for the conservation of lions in Cameroon. Pricelia is currently the coordinator of the Centre for Environment Studies in Cameroon where she continues work on human-wildlife conflict mitigation. Recent works involves the training of animators and administrators for the fight against poaching in the northern regions of Cameroon.

Dr. Frank P.G. Princée

Frank Princée has a scientific background in population genetics and management of small populations in zoological gardens and wildlife reserves.  He was involved, as manager of the conservation fund of Dutch zoos, in the initiation (with Ludwig Siefert) of a population project on lions in Queen Elizabeth National Park (Uganda) which later extended to large carnivores and scavengers. This all happened at a time (end 1990s) when the first alarm bells on the status of this species could be heard. Frank organised (with Hans Bauer and Hans de Iongh) meetings and training workshops in West and Central Africa that resulted in the creation of the West and Central African Lion Conservation Network.

In 2001, Frank left the Dutch zoo federation (and the Netherlands) and continued as a self-employed consultant in a variety of conservation-related fields – including capacity training, reintroduction planning, transect surveys/analyses and website design (www.princee.com).

He lived between 2005 and 2010 in Ranomafana, Madagascar and until March 2013 in Bayanga, Central African Republic (CAR).  The CAR coup d’état forced Frank to leave and ended initial plans to survey large carnivores.  Frank is currently living in the UK where he is finishing a book on management of small populations.

Etotépé A. SOGBOHOSSOU

Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, BENIN

I have a degree of ‘Ingenieur Agronome’ (agricultural engineer), an MSc in Natural Resources

Management and a PhD in Conservation Biology from the University of Leiden, The Netherlands.  I

have done research on wildlife trade, human-wildlife conflicts, wildlife species ecology, elephant, giraffe  and large carnivores population monitoring. I have implemented few projects to raise awareness  towards large carnivores and natural resources conservation and improve the livelihoods of local communities  living around protected areas. I am currently assistant professor in the Department of Natural resources Management at the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, Benin. My duty includes teaching BSc and MSc students, supervising students…. My current research focus among others on the monitoring of lion and cheetah in my country with the use of camera trapping. I am interested in investigating the impact of anthropogenic activities on large carnivores and how carnivores coexist in order to improve the conservation status of the endangered large carnivores of West Africa.

Coordinates

I live and work in Abomey-Calavi (6°21′36″ N –  2° 26′24″ E)

I mainly do my field research in Pendjari (10°30 -11°30  N; 0°50 – 2°00 E) and W transboundary (11°10 – 12°30 N and 1°50 – 3°10E) biosphere reserves in Benin.