African-lion Working Group

 

Wild lions in Africa are almost extinct.

In Africa, there are only about 12 000 lions left in the wild. The African lion is already close to extinct in 7 West African countries, with only about 400 remaining. The lion population declined by 42% in 21 years. Numbers are also falling on the rest of the continent and therefore the majestic cats of the African bush could be extinct by 2050.

Reasons for the dwindling numbers.

The vulnerability of the African lion population is ultimately due to poaching by humans and shrinking of their natural habitat. In turn, it also leads to a decline in the numbers of the animals lions hunt for food. Lions are now on the world’s list of threatened species so the situation is very serious. If we want to save the African lions of the wild, we need to take drastic action. We have to work now in order to save the lions for the future.

Conservationists and relevant communities have to cooperate to prohibit killing out of fear and especially, for retaliation. We need to devise strategies against poaching with the aim of importing and exporting lion body parts. Most of all, humans also need to ensure that there are spaces available where the natural habitat of these animals can be given back to them. Finally, people need to learn to coexist with lions through practical plans and above all, education. We have to create an understanding of the situation and as a result, stop the indiscriminate killing of the large cats.

 

The African Lion Working Group works for the conservation of the African lion.

Mission Statement

The Mission of the ALWG is the promotion of comprehensive, scientifically based conservation strategies for free-roaming lion populations in Africa.

 

Aims and goals of ALWG: 

  • Act as an invaluable portal for communication and networking.
  • Provide a forum for discussion and debate regarding lion conservation as well as relevant research matters.
  • Disseminate factual, scientifically based information to wildlife managers, politicians, NGO’s as well as the general public.
  • Support individuals who are conducting research on lions.
  • Assist those who are working in Africa towards the conservation and management of free-roaming lion populations in accordance with IUCN principles.
  • Promote the development and maintenance of comprehensive management strategies for all lion populations in Africa.
  • Work with stakeholder groups within the framework of ALWG policy.
  • Seek assistance from its affiliate organisations and any other credible entities, if required, to
    support its recommendations.
The African Lion Working Group aligns itself with:
  • The Cat Specialist Group.
  • Conservation Breeding Specialist Group of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature/Species Survival Commission.
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African Lion Working Group